The Mighty Redwoods


Osiyo~

The Mighty Redwoods as a Setting

It’s so great having you back, Jannine! What a great book you’re here to share today. Let’s jump right in. 🙂

Calisa, thanks so much for having me on your blog today to promote my new release, A Deadly Love. I thought I’d talk a little about setting. For me, where the story takes place is huge. It creates more than just a location for the action. The setting is key in creating the tone of the story. A book that takes place on the beach in the summer is probably going to be lighthearted and fun. If your characters are stuck in a backwoods town with a gothic mansion sporting gargoyles and… Well, you get the picture.

A Deadly Love takes place in the fictional town of Woodvale in Northern California. Woodvale is located just south of the very real town of Crescent City. I know this area well—I grew up here. Which brings me to my second point—when creating a setting, authenticity is everything to the reader. You can’t beat firsthand knowledge for giving a location the small details that will make it pop.

So, back to Woodvale. It’s a logging community set deep in the redwoods. If you’ve never seen a redwood tree, they’re incredibly impressive—towering, massive. There’s also lots of fog, as the setting is very close to the coast. What better place for mystery and suspense? What better place to hunt for a serial killer who ties his victims to redwoods and… I’ll stop. I don’t want to give away the whole plot!

I’ll leave you with the blurb and the opening scene from A Deadly Love, which I hope gives you a good sense of both the tone and the setting of the book. The photos were taken by moi. I’d love to answer any questions you may have!

^^^^^

Blurb:

In the heart of the redwoods, a madman waits…

Recovering from a broken engagement and determined to start over, Brooke Wakefield flees to her grandmother’s home deep in the redwood forest. Discovering her teenage crush lives next door is a less than auspicious beginning. The last thing she needs is another man to break her heart, but every time Dillon glances her way, her heat level soars.

Dillon Tremayne isn’t looking for a relationship. With a young son, an eccentric grandfather, and a logging company running him ragged, he can’t afford any romantic entanglements. But Brooke’s humor and strength are hard to resist.

When a woman from his past is brutally murdered and another disappears, Dillon is heartsick—and terrified the killer will target Brooke next. Can Brooke and Dillon find love in the heart of the forest? Or will a madman’s twisted dream destroy their chance at happiness?

 

Excerpt:

 

Fog shrouded the towering redwoods, swirled around the massive trunks, and settled on the fern covered floor of the forest. Brooke Wakefield clutched the steering wheel, straining to see the road through the dense mist creeping in from the Northern California coast. Swearing under her breath, she leaned forward, her gaze focused on the barely discernable yellow line down the center of the highway.

Why didn’t I stay in Eureka? Another bad decision on her part, and there’d been far too many of them lately. A sign loomed ahead, its reflective paint just visible in the gloom.

“Ah, there’s our exit.” She slowed the Subaru to a crawl and turned onto the narrow county road leading to Woodvale. Gradually, she increased her speed. Warm air blasted through the heater vents, and she hummed to an old Rolling Stones tune playing on the radio. “Almost there, Otis. I can’t wait to get out of this miserable fog.”

The dog hung his shaggy head over the seat and moaned. Drool dripped on her shoulder. She loosened her white-knuckled grip on the wheel and gave him a shove. “Back off, boy. Only a couple of miles to go now.”

A flicker of movement caught her eye seconds before a figure in white burst onto the road. The woman threw up her arm and blinked in the headlights’ glare. A cloud of dark hair surrounded a white face dominated by terrified eyes. A blood chilling scream rent the air.

Brooke slammed on the brakes and jerked the wheel. Fear lodged in her throat as the tires slid on damp pavement, caught, then slid again. The giant trunk of a redwood rushed toward her, and a tremendous jolt hurled her into oblivion.

 ^^^^

Links:

Website: http://www.janninegallant.com/

Blog: http://janninegallant.blogspot.com/

Group Blog: http://rosesofprose.blogspot.com/

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/#!/JannineGallant.Author

Twitter: https://twitter.com/JannineGallant

 

Publisher: http://www.thewildrosepress.com/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=195&products_id=4940

Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=ntt_athr_dp_sr_1?_encoding=UTF8&search-alias=books&field-author=Jannine%20Gallant

Barnes & Noble: http://www.barnesandnoble.com/s/jannine-gallant?r=1

That’s a great cover and excerpt. Thank you again, Jannine.

So what about you? How do you use settings to help your writing? Do you have a favorite setting?

Dodadagohvi~

Advertisements

About Calisa Rhose

I'm a mother of three daughters, five granddaughters, and wife to a wonderfully supportive man. I began writing warm-you-to-the-bones romance as a teen, and the addiction has now morphed into a life of its own. I became a published author in May 2011! I create art and jewelry with polymer clay and beads to relax, and have a passion for sewing for fun. Check out my Tips From an Editor blog at https://painlessediting.wordpress.com/ See my art and sewing projects at http://lisasfancifulallure.wordpress.com

Posted on 08/21/2012, in Blog Tour, guest blogging, Pen of the Dreamer, Promotion, Publishers, Welcome and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 32 Comments.

  1. Great excerpt! I have to read this one! Good job, Jannine. I spent a few years as a child in the redwoods and you have nailed the setting! Awesome!

    Like

    • janninegallant

      I grew up near Crescent City, close to my fictional town in this book. It rains A LOT, but it sure is beautiful up there. Thanks for stopping by, Regina.

      Like

  2. I’m so glad the party went smoothly while I was away. 😀 Jannine, I hope to get this book added to my tbr soon…not that I’ll be able to read it soon, but I want it! lol

    Like

    • janninegallant

      You’re funny, Calisa. I think we all have TBR lists a mile long! Thanks for having me. It was a great turnout!

      Like

  3. I have to agree with everyone so far. This does look like a page turner and you have an intriquing setting. Me. you had me with the title. Best of luck with your release!

    Like

    • janninegallant

      I usually hate coming up with titles. But this one came easily. Glad you like it!

      Like

  4. Now that is creepy. I’ll have to check it out! I agree about setting and see it as much as a part of the story as the characters and plot. Great topic.

    Like

  5. Hi Jannine,
    Sorry I’m late. Love this blog post. You did a fantastic job with setting in A Deadly Love. I adore this story…you know how I love the creepy stuff, and your villain is creepy deluxe! 🙂 I’m so thrilled the book is released, here’s wishing you many, many sales for this excellent novel (I agree with your daughter. This is my favorite of your stories!)

    Like

  6. Hi, Jannine. Wonderful opening and blurb. It definitely makes me want to read more! The setting you’ve chosen adds to the sense of danger lurking around the corner. I love a good sinister setting for a suspensful novel!

    Like

    • janninegallant

      Mae, I’ve been wanting to set a book in this area for a while. I knew this was the perfect plot for the setting. Thanks for visiting.

      Like

  7. Hi, Jannine. Great post. Setting is so important. As you’ve shown, it can also set mood and atmosphere. Nice job. Book sounds great.

    Like

  8. I think settings can lend so many different nuances-like you said, Jannine. The excerpt is very enticing; a great place to end it for us…definitely makes me want more.

    Like

  9. I agree also. How can you expect the reader to see the story if you don’t show them where they’re at.
    I find your setting fascinating. I’ve never seen a redwood tree except in pictures. I can’t imagine what it would be like to actually stand beside one.

    Like

    • janninegallant

      Looking up at a redwood is a humbling experience. There’s really nothing like them. Thanks for visiting today.

      Like

  10. As always, my darling Jannine, you hit a homer!
    Calisa–love the website. Gorgeous colors, easy on the eyes. Wish I could do something like this.
    Best ever to you both
    Kathy

    Like

    • janninegallant

      Thanks, Kathy. This one is a little darker than my other books, but my daughter said it’s her favorite so far.

      Like

  11. Alison Henderson

    I agree that setting is crucial, right up there after characters. In some stories it almost becomes a character! And I LOVE the setting for this book. Can you believe I never saw a redwood forest until a few years ago? There’s nothing like it anywhere, and it’s the perfect setting for romantic suspense.

    Like

    • janninegallant

      I couldn’t agree more. All those tall trees, and rolling fog. I couldn’t resist throwing in a serial killer in a setting like that!

      Like

  12. Excellent post, Jannine. I totally agree with you–setting is everything. Particularly when writing historicals as I do, but for any story. Yours really sounds good.

    Like

    • janninegallant

      Thanks, Beth. In historicals, it’s so much more than just the setting you have to get right. You have to create a feel for a time in the past, too. You do it beautifully!

      Like

      • Thanks. I’m agonizing over just such a challenge right now. Sometimes I think how much easier it would be not to. But writers, as you know, are driven.

        Like

  13. Thanks for your early visits Joanna and Christine!

    Welcome back Jannine! I hope the day job lets you pop in now and then. 🙂 I’ll be out all afternoon at the dr. with the girl but don’t let that stop you from playing on the Ranch! 😀

    Like

  14. Wonderful excerpt and blurb…this sounds like a page turner and you’re so right, setting is so important to set up the feel of the story. Sounds like you picked a good one.

    And I love your cover! Congrats 🙂

    Like

    • janninegallant

      Good to hear from you, Christine. I hope it’s a page turner. If it isn’t, I failed! LOL

      Like

  15. Joanna Aislinn

    Very important details to slip in just the right way, when one does setting. I also liked the premise of the story and the excerpt looked very good. I might just check this one out 😉

    Like

    • janninegallant

      Joanna, you’re right about slipping in the setting details. You can’t do it in an info dump. Subtlety is key – and much more effective. Thanks for stopping by.

      Like

%d bloggers like this: