Hair today, gone tomorrow – Mackenzie Crowne


Osiyo~

I have a special post today, by an even more special guest. Nope. No round pen for this heroine. Only a cushy rocker for her and her little shadow tyke will do.

As you all know, October is Breast Cancer Awareness month. This event repeats every year, thank God!

I know it, have driven blocks out of the way to avoid walker/joggers on the Susan G Komen trek, seen pink everywhere I look, hear about it on television. But oddly, I’ve never been more aware since reading one novella, self-published by a new friend. When she contacted me to edit her ‘story’ I jumped at the chance and am thankful I did. I wonder if I’ll ever read another story that impacted me more–doubt I will.

Where Would You Like Your Nipple is an account of one woman’s walk from dark to light that is breast cancer. I don’t know anyone going through this disastrous disease, only have ever met one person who had it and lost and I didn’t know her for very long so I wasn’t hit by her journey the way this one hit me. I’m here to tell you–if you have, or know someone who has/had breast cancer, heck even if you say no to both of these– This book will change your life. You won’t be able to help it. Even if, like me, you pay a little extra attention to your own body, get a mammogram, the book has paid for itself.

I’d like a big Ranch welcome and show of love for a wonderful woman, wife, mother, grandmother, friend, sister, daughter, romance author… SURVIVOR; Mackenzie Crowne.

Hair today, gone tomorrow.

If you’re a social media hound like me, you won’t have missed the recent, heart-wrenching posts of Kelly Pickler shaving her head in solidarity with her best friend who is battling breast cancer. I was in the process of releasing Where Would You Like Your Nipple? my survivor’s guide to navigating the breast cancer abyss at the time, and couldn’t help noticing the many posts. Like so many others, my attention was snagged by the pictures of the friends together. After all, they’re beautiful; two gorgeous women with nothing but a shadow of fuzz covering their skulls, ala Sinead O’Connor. And well, as a survivor who has experienced chemo, I’ve been there, done that.

But as I witnessed the furor over Kelly’s actions on social media, I found myself willing the millions of women touched by the stories to truly understand the scope of loss those pictures represented. Kelly’s friend is facing chemo, proving the disease has advanced far enough that radical measures are needed. No matter the stage, breast cancer is a bitch and survivors will carry the scars of battle, both physical and emotional,  for the rest of their lives. But early detection reduces the scars left behind. Catching breast cancer early lessens the possibility of body-altering surgeries and debilitating treatments. It eliminates the need for reconstruction and fear of developing new issues, like lymphedema. And let’s face it, ladies, average looking women don’t look like Kelly and her friend when they lose their hair. For months after chemo, I more closely resembled Dr. Evil in the Austin Powers movies than the lovely Sinead.

Sure, hair grows back, and considering all the crappy stuff a breast cancer patient deals with, a temporarily bald head is low on the list, but I’ll tell you this, the memory of crying in the shower while clumps of your hair clog the drain never quite fades away. There are many experiences from my breast cancer battle I wouldn’t wish on my worst enemy – okay, maybe one or two, but the point is, I don’t want YOU to experience them.

So, what are you waiting for? Check those ta-tas. Go ahead, I’ll wait.

*whistling the theme from Jeopardy*

All good? Awesome! Now, don’t forget to check them again next month. You’ll be glad you did!

Thanks for being a shining inspiration. Love ya Mac.

Dodadagohvi~

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About Calisa Rhose

I'm a mother of three daughters, five granddaughters, and wife to a wonderfully supportive man. I began writing warm-you-to-the-bones romance as a teen, and the addiction has now morphed into a life of its own. I became a published author in May 2011! I create art and jewelry with polymer clay and beads to relax, and have a passion for sewing for fun. Check out my Tips From an Editor blog at https://painlessediting.wordpress.com/ See my art and sewing projects at http://lisasfancifulallure.wordpress.com

Posted on 10/11/2012, in Welcome and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 28 Comments.

  1. Get your mammogram. From ‘something’ in one x-ray, to an aggressive blob the next year, you have to take care of your own health.
    Losing the hair didn’t bother me too much. Radiation was the bitch. I almost quit then. During the treatment process, I learned of a writer friend who died with breath cancer. It made me aware that I was lucky to find mine. If anything it made me aware of my own vulnerability. It made me a better person. It made me care.
    Get your mammogram. Don’t put it off.

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    • Good advice, Pepper. I’m so sorry about your friend, and I’m glad you are still here to tell about it.

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    • Yay you, Pepper, for continuing the fight. Unfortunately, too many are like your friend. I also lost a friend to BC in the midst of my own battle. The experience was devastating but like you with your friend, her loss made me that much more aware of how lucky I was. And that’s why we need to keep beating the early detection drum.

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  2. That’s a beautiful story, Debra! Thank you for sharing. 🙂

    I don’t want Mac to leave! Thank you girlfriend! I think you know how much this post means to me today… But this post will be here for anyone else who comes by. I’ll forward notices to Mac of more comments. 😀

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  3. Beautiful post. When my sister-in-law was diagnosed last year, her brother (my hubby) was the one who went over to shave her head for her before too much of it fell out in the shower or on the pillow. They laughed and they cried together over the experience. He also shaved his head to support her. This is a little different on a man than a woman, but it was a wonderful gesture of love on his part. My SIL is now considered a survivor as well. She had her last reconstruction procedure earlier this month and can now move forward with her life. I will definitely recommend your book to her.

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    • Go SIL!!! and I love what your hubby did, Debra, both the help shaving her head and shaving his own. Those types of gestures help you realize you aren’t alone.

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  4. LOL We mothers have a way of getting what we want, don’t we, Mac?

    I think I’d be the same way, Callie. Well, maybe not so much now that I’m more ‘not brown’ than brown-haired! 😆

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  5. Great post. It’s funny you mentioned losing hair is only one of the things a breast cancer patient has to deal with. Years ago I was mis-diagnosed with a lump, and I remember calling a good friend and crying that if it turned out to be breast cancer, I was going to lose my hair. For some reason that bothered me more than anything. Crazy, I know.

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    • The hair loss is a big thing for many, Calisa. Its so in your face. A constant reminder. Personally I didn’t care, excerpt for those few minutes in the shower – oh, and when my future DIL said they wanted to get married a month after i finished chemo. Mothers of the groom shouldn’t be bald. I got my way, needless to say 😉

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  6. Mac, we hardly noticed the bald head when we looked at you. The sparkle in your eyes and glow of your smile came thru first. Luckily you were blessed with a nice shaped head and good hats so you pulled it off with a flair. I think the hardest part for you was not being able to twirl your favorite lock of hair while you read. Have a blast on your book signing trip!!!!

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    • Lol Don’t tell my secrets, R! And I had a favorite hank of hair to twirl thanks to my crafty girls. 🙂

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    • Isn’t that the truth? I just love this picture- the first I ever saw of Mackenzie Crowne. Beautiful and speaks so loudly on so many levels.

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  7. What an amazing post. Mac, I choked up on the shower part. My mother had breast cancer and lymphedema, and both of her sisters had it as well. It scares me to think of the strong potential hanging over my head. I hear such courageous stories from women who have battled this (a good friend went through it too and emerged tougher and stronger) but I guess we never know how we’ll handle anything until faced with it.

    Thanks for a touching post and reminder of actions we can take for early detection.

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    • Forewarned is forearmed, Mae. (crap did i spell that right?) Sounds like you come from strong stock but stay on top of your self exams!

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  8. Oh and I forgot to say I LOVE that cover. How awesome is THAT! So stinking cool.
    And I think that dude’s name was “Mini Me” Christine! LOL

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    • AJ, you know I love you more than my Jeep! Isn’t the cover gorgeous? I’m sitting in the airport, off to meet the artist for a BC fund raiser in Tampa where I’ll be doing my very first book signing. (I even had my nails done). I’ll get to visit with my mom and sissy too. Who knew spreading the word would have so many yummy perks? 🙂

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  9. Oh. My. God. Mac, I just love you so! You are truly one of the best babes out there…regardless of where your nipple is located. This post is amazing. I’m off to check my boobs and then purchase a copy of your book. You both inspire me (Calisa and you), and I’m one lucky chick to count you among my friends. (((hugs)))

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  10. I’ve read a few snippets on SSS and this is an amazing story told with such heart. I have several friends that have gone through chemo, either with breast cancer or some other form of cancer, and you are so right in saying it’s something you wouldn’t want to wish on your worst enemy.

    Thanks so much for sharing your story!

    Oh, and I just had to say if I lost my hair, I’d be standing right next to you looking like Dr. Evil…or maybe Little Me (wasn’t that his name!)?

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    • LOL Christine. I spent several months humming “Don’t you wish your girlfriend was HOT like me?” 😉 Hubby just rolled his eyes.

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      • It was very inspiring that a Sr. here made a shaved head project her class project this week. Even the one Prom Queen candidate will go to prom bald. It was nice to see young girls, in high school, get so involved in PINK month!

        You’re so welcome Mac! 🙂

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  11. Fantastic post, ladies!! (((Mac))) thanks so much for helping to bring attention to breast cancer. You are truly inspiring!

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  12. Welcome, Mac! I’m so proud to have you with me today. 😀

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    • And I’m so proud to be here with my awesome editor. Thanks so much for sharing this topic. One heart touched could be a life saved. You’re a heroine!

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  1. Pingback: Mae Clair’s Editor Spotlight: Calisa Rhose | From the Pen of Mae Clair

  2. Pingback: Mac's Mad Mania » Blog Archive » Hair Today ~ Gone Tomorrow ~ #BreastCancer Awareness Month

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